Breakfast with Relog

The world’s ongoing drive of digitalisation, artificial intelligence, machine learning, block chain, big data, IOT and other developing technologies, is in turn driving the development of new technologies for warehousing and distribution centres.  This ongoing development not only increases functionality and the plethora of solutions available in the market, but it also reduces the initial capital investment required which in turn makes the adoption of automation and or mechanisation so much more accessible to more and more companies.

Internationally, there is a shortage of skilled blue-collar workers, willing to work in industrial and warehouse environments which has led to the development of significant level of automation and mechanisation.  In South Africa, we are faced with high levels of unemployment, poorly skilled labour, and a depreciating Rand.  The question we ask is can we morally implement automation in South Africa?  Can we afford it?  Can we take elements of automation and mechanisation that are suitable internationally (Europe & America – 1st World) and apply them in an African developing market and 3rd world scenario?  Furthermore, the pandemic has also forced many businesses to relook at how labour is deployed to maintain social distancing.  How do you balance employee wellbeing and busines continuity? 

Our panel of international and local speakers will address these and other topics.

The world’s ongoing drive of digitalisation, artificial intelligence, machine learning, block chain, big data, IOT and other developing technologies, is in turn driving the development of new technologies for warehousing and distribution centres.  This ongoing development not only increases functionality and the plethora of solutions available in the market, but it also reduces the initial capital investment required which in turn makes the adoption of automation and or mechanisation so much more accessible to more and more companies.

Internationally, there is a shortage of skilled blue-collar workers, willing to work in industrial and warehouse environments which has led to the development of significant level of automation and mechanisation.  In South Africa, we are faced with high levels of unemployment, poorly skilled labour, and a depreciating Rand.  The question we ask is can we morally implement automation in South Africa?  Can we afford it?  Can we take elements of automation and mechanisation that are suitable internationally (Europe & America – 1st World) and apply them in an African developing market and 3rd world scenario?  Furthermore, the pandemic has also forced many businesses to relook at how labour is deployed to maintain social distancing.  How do you balance employee wellbeing and busines continuity? 

Our panel of international and local speakers will address these and other topics.